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Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Source(google.com.pk)
Diabetes And Kidney Disease Biography
THE FOLLOWING are brief sketches that describe the professional training and experience, particularly as they relate to the KDOQI Blood Pressure Management in CKD Clinical Practice Guidelines, as well as principal academic affiliations of the work group members. All work group members completed a disclosure statement certifying that any potential conflict of interest would not influence their judgment or actions concerning the KDOQI.

Lawrence Agodoa, MD, is Director, End Stage Renal Disease Program for the National Institutes of Health. He received his Fellowship in Nephrology and Rheumatology from the University of Washington. He is currently an Attending Physician, Nephrology Services at Walter Reed Medical Center. Dr Agodoa’s areas of research and special interest are in hypertension and end-stage renal disease.

Sharon Anderson, MD, is Professor of Medicine Oregon Health and Science University, Division of Nephrology. She completed a Fellowship in Nephrology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Her areas of research and interest are in hypertension and the kidney, pathophysiology of the kidney, diabetic nephropathy, hormonal modulation of renal function, and mechanisms of progressive glomerular injury. Dr Anderson has received research grants from Genzyme, Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, Merck, and Polycystic Kidney Research Foundation. She is on the National Kidney Foundation’s CKD Advisory Board.

Sharon P. Andreoli, MD, is Professor of Pediatrics at Indiana University Medical Center, James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children. She completed a Fellowship in Pediatric Nephrology at Indiana University. Dr Andreoli’s area of research or special interest is hemolytic uremic syndrome, oxidant injury, dialysis, pediatric nephrology, and clinical pediatric nephrology. Dr Andreoli has served as Councilor and is currently Secretary-Treasurer of the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology. She has served as Councilor and is currently an Assistant Secretary for the International Pediatric Nephrology Association. Dr Andreoli has also served on several National Kidney Foundation committees, including serving as chairman of fellowship grant review committee. She is a member of the NKF Scientific Advisory Board, the KDOQI Support group, and the ASN/NKF Ad Hoc Committee for development of collaborative research initiatives. Dr Andreoli has received grants from the NIH, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, and Genentech.

George R. Bailie, MSc PharmD, PhD, is a Professor of Pharmacy Practice at Albany College of Pharmacy. His specialty in research is pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacokinetics in CKD and dialysis. He has published numerous original research papers, chapters, reviews, and cases in the medical and pharmacy literature. He serves on the editorial board for Peritoneal Dialysis International and is a regular reviewer for many nephrology journals. He has been honored with several awards, including Educator of the Year and Researcher of the Year awards, New York State Chapter of ACCP, and Fellow of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, in recognition of sustained original contributions to pharmaceutical knowledge. He has received research grants from Renal Research Institute, Inc., National Kidney Foundation of North East New York, and Baxter Healthcare. Dr Bailie has also served as a consultant and speaker for several pharmaceutical companies, including Amgen. He is a director of Nephrology Pharmacy Associates, Inc.

George L. Bakris, MD, is Professor of Preventive Medicine and Internal Medicine, the Vice Chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine and the Director of the Hypertension/Clinical Research Center at Rush Presbyterian, St. Luke’s Medical Center. He previously served as Director, Renal Research at Ochsner Clinic and Director, Nephrology Fellowship Program at University of Texas, San Antonio. Dr Bakris serves as a NKF representative for the JNC 6 and JNC 7 and is a Board Certified Specialist in Hypertension. He has received numerous NIH grants for controlled trials, including AASK, the Hypertension Genetics (SCOR), and the K30, Clinical Trials Center awards. Dr Bakris has received research funds or grants from Abbott, Aventis, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Forest, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, and Pharmacia.

Kline Bolton, MD, FACP, is Professor of Medicine at University of Virginia in Charlottesville, where he is Chief of the Division of Nephrology and Director of the Nephrology Clinical Research Center, Kidney Center, and Renal Operations. He has received special honors from organizations ranging from the American Society for Clinical Investigation to the International Society of Nephrology. He has published many articles in journals, ranging from the American Journal of Kidney Diseases and Kidney International to Immunologic Renal Diseases, and has contributed to numerous textbooks, including the Textbook of the Autoimmune Diseases and the Textbook of Nephrology. Dr Bolton is Chairman of the Renal Physicians Association Work Group on Appropriate Preparation of Patients for Renal Replacement Therapy. In addition, Dr Bolton serves on the Advisory Boards for Amgen and Ortho-Biotech. His research interests are in refining the epitope(s) involved in causing Goodpasture’s syndrome, treating glomerulonephritis, and disease management of CKD and ESRD.

Mary Beth Callahan, ACSW, LCSW, is a Nephrology Social Worker at the Dallas Transplant Institute. She serves on the Network #14 Medical Review Board and the Life Options Rehabilitation Advisory Council. She formerly served as CNSW chair and as a Kidney Health Program Advisory Board member for the Texas Department of Health. Her areas of research include quality of life measurement, rehabilitation, adherence, and outcome-driven nephrology social work practice. Ms Callahan was honored with the Distinguished Service Award from the National Kidney Foundation.

Jeffrey A. Cutler, MD, MPH, is Senior Scientific Advisor, Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications (DECA), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). He is involved with many NHLBI studies and is a member of their governing committees, including the Steering Committee for the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) and the Executive Committee for the Trials of Hypertension Prevention (TOHP). Dr Cutler has received several rewards from the US Public Health Service, including two Commendation Medals, an Outstanding Service Medal, and a Meritorious Services Medal. His areas of research and special interest are the prevention and treatment of hypertension, the prevention of other cardiovascular diseases, controlled trials’ methods, and nutrition. Dr Cutler is affiliated with the American Heart Association, the American Public Health Association, the Society of Epidemiological Research, the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention—World Heart Federation, and the American College of Preventive Medicine.

Jane H. Greene, RD, CSR, is the renal nutritionist and clinical instructor at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She has served on the Board of Director for the End Stage Renal Disease Network 8 and the National Kidney Foundation of Middle Tennessee. She has researched and authored several scientific articles on topics related to nutrition and chronic kidney disease.

Tom Hostetter, MD, is a senior scientific adviser and director of the National Kidney Disease Education Program at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. He is also professor of medicine on leave from the University of Minnesota, where he was director of the renal division in the department of internal medicine for 15 years. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Yale University. After graduating from Baylor College of Medicine, Dr Hostetter served his internship at Baylor and the remainder of his residency at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. Following his nephrology fellowship at the Brigham, he stayed as a member of the faculty of Harvard Medical School. Dr Hostetter’s major research interest is in the mechanisms of progressive renal disease. He has served on several editorial boards, General Medicine B study section of the NIH, the Nephrology board of the American Board of Internal Medicine, and the councils of the American and International Societies of Nephrology and was president of the American Society of Nephrology from 1999 to 2000.

Cynda Ann Johnson, MD, MBA, is professor and dean of the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. She is past president of the American Board of Family Practice and was recently elected as Vice President of the American Board of Medical Specialties. She is on the Steering Committee of NKDEP and the Advisory Board of KDOQI of the NKF.

James P. Lash, MD, is an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and the Program Director of the Nephrology Fellowship at the University of Illinois. His research interests include chronic renal insufficiency, hypertension, transplant, and diabetic nephropathy. He has participated in a number controlled trials, including the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) and the RENAAL Study. He is currently a Co-Investigator for the AASK Cohort Study and a Principal Investigator for the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. Dr Lash has received research funds from Merck Research Labs.

Andrew S. Levey, MD, (Work Group Chair), is Dr Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine and Chief of the William B. Schwartz, MD Division of Nephrology at Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston. His research is mainly in the areas of epidemiology of CKD and cardiovascular disease in CKD, controlled trials to slow the progression of CKD, clinical assessment of kidney function, assessment and improvement of outcomes in dialysis and transplantation, and clinical practice guideline development and implementation. Dr Levey is currently Program Director for an NIDDK-funded clinical research training program, “Clinical Trials, Epidemiology and Outcomes Research in Nephrology.” He is past Chair of the Clinical Science Committee of the American Society of Nephrology. He is past Chair of the National Kidney Foundation’s Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease in Chronic Renal Disease and KDOQI Work Group on Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation, Classification and Stratification. Dr Levey is the recipient of the National Kidney Foundation’s President Award of 1998 and Garabed Eknoyan Award of 2002. He is the Director of the newly formed KDOQI Center for Clinical Practice Guideline Development and Implementation at Tufts-New England Medical Center.

Peter A. McCullough, MD, MPH, FACC, FACP, FAHA is Consultant Cardiologist and Chief of Nutrition and Preventive Medicine at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan. Dr McCullough has over 200 published scientific communications. His principal research interest is in how CKD works as a cardiovascular risk state. Dr McCullough serves as an editorial consultant for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and is an Associate Editor of Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine.

Edgar R. Miller III, MD, PhD, is the Assistant Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at John Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr Miller completed a fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins and is a faculty member in the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research. Dr Miller’s research has focused on the prevention and treatment of hypertension and CKD through both nonpharmacological and pharmacological approaches. His current studies are funded by the American Heart Association (lifestyle intervention for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly) and the NIH (African-American Study of Kidney disease—cohort study). He practices General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Outpatient center and serves as a Hypertension Specialist designated by the American Society of Hypertension.

Joseph V. Nally, MD, is Director of the Nephrology Fellowship Program at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. He completed his Fellowship in Nephrology at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital. Dr Nally is on the ACP-MKSAP Writing Committee and is also a representative for the National Kidney Foundation Medical Advisory Board to the American College of Physicians. Dr Nally has been a speaker for Amgen, Merck, and Novartis. His area of research is with the National Institute of Health’s Studies of Renal Vascular Hypertension.

John D. Pirsch, MD, is Director of Medical Transplantation Service and is Professor of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin Medical School. Dr Pirsch has received research funds or grants from Fujisawa Healthcare Inc., MedImmune Inc., Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Roche Pharmaceuticals, and SangStat. His areas of research are in primary care and long-term complications of the transplant recipient and new immunosuppressive drugs.

Ronald J. Portman, MD, is Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension at the University of Texas-Houston Medical School. He completed his Fellowship in Pediatric Nephrology at Washington University School of Medicine and St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Dr Portman has been an active Journal Reviewer and has published over 100 papers. He is the Chairman of the Executive Committee of the International Pediatric Hypertension Association and is an ASH Clinical Hypertension Specialist. He is a member of the American Society of Nephrology, the Southwest Pediatric Nephrology Study Group, the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology and the International Pediatric Nephrology Association. He is also an Associate Member of the American Board of Pediatrics, a member of the ASN Hypertension Advisory Council, and a member of the Medical Advisory Committee to the Cardio-renal Section of the FDA. His community service has led him to Co-Direct Pediatric Dialysis Camp and to be a member of the Medical Advisory Board of the National Kidney Foundation of Southeast Texas and of the Medical Review Board of ESRD Network 14 of Texas. He reports research grants from Boerhinger-Ingelheim, King, AstraZenica, Pfizer, and Novartis.

Michael V. Rocco, MD, MSCE, is a Professor of Medicine and Nephrology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He received his MD degree at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee and also served his Internal Medicine residency at Vanderbilt. He completed a nephrology fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and received a master’s degree in epidemiology at Wake Forest University. He was the Principal Investigator at Wake Forest for the NIH-sponsored HEMO Study and was the chair of the Nutrition Committee for this study. He is the principal investigator for the NIH Frequent Hemodialysis Network for clinical trials in daily nocturnal hemodialysis. He serves as the Vice-Chair for the National Kidney Foundation’s KDOQI. He is also a member of the CMS ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Quality Improvement Committee and is chair of the peritoneal dialysis subcommittee. He has more than 70 peer-reviewed manuscripts in the areas of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, nutrition, chronic renal failure, and epidemiology.

Mary Ann Sevick, ScD, RN, is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Pittsburgh. She also serves as Affiliate faculty in the Center for Bioethics and Health Law at the University of Pittsburgh. She has published numerous articles in scientific journals such as the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Peritoneal Dialysis International, American Journal of Nephrology, Preventive Medicine, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, and American Journal of Health Behavior. She has also presented at many national and international proceedings or conferences. She has participated in numerous NIH-funded studies involving behavior change interventions and is Principal Investigator on studies examining the effectiveness of adherence enhancement interventions in persons with type 2 diabetes and also individuals receiving maintenance hemodialysis.

Domenic Sica, MD, is Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia of Virginia Commonwealth University. He received a Nephrology Fellowship from the University of Texas. Dr Sica’s areas of research and special interest are minority health-care issues as relates to hypertension and/or renal disease. He has received research funds or grants from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Sanofi-Syntheolabo, Novartis, Biovail, and Reliant.

Donald E. Wesson, MD, is Chairman, Department of Internal Medicine at Texas Tech University of Health Science Center. He received his Fellowship in Nephrology. Dr Wesson’s area of research and special interest is in Acid-Base progression of CKD. He received a research grant from Minority Health and Education Research Grant Program.
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease
Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Kidney Treatment

Source(google.com.pk)
Kidney Treatment Biography
Researchers at the University are developing a bio-artificial kidney that uses living kidney cells to duplicate nearly all the functions of a healthy organ. While still in the experimental stage, the bio-artificial kidney could one day provide life-saving treatment for thousands of people with serious kidney disease.

“The kidney is the first human organ for which a mechanical substitute—the kidney dialysis machine—was designed,” says H. David Humes, the John G. Searle Professor of Internal Medicine. “We believe it also will be the first organ to have a fully functioning, implantable substitute created with the new science of tissue engineering.”

Humes and his research team recently completed animal testing of a key component of the bio-artificial kidney, called a Renal Tubule Assist Device. This device is designed for use outside the body to treat acute kidney failure.

Each year in the United States, about 190,000 people face this life-threatening condition, in which the kidneys suddenly shut down as a result of infection or injury.

Individuals with acute renal failure typically spend at least 10 days in intensive care attached to a hemo-filtration unit, which removes toxic waste products from their blood. But even with advanced medical care, more than 50 percent of these patients die before their kidneys can recover.

In a study published in the May 1999 issue of Nature—Biotechnology, Humes describes how the Renal Tubule Assist Device, connected to a standard hemofiltration unit, helped improve kidney function in laboratory animals with acute renal failure.

According to Humes, kidney cells lining hollow fibers in the device reabsorb vital electrolytes, water and glucose filtered out of blood during hemofiltration, in addition to producing other important molecules. Without these substances, the patient cannot fight off infections and maintain a normal fluid balance.

Pending FDA approval, human clinical trials for the Renal Tubule Assist Device in patients with acute kidney failure could begin as early as this fall. Within five years, Humes hopes to develop additional components of the bio-artificial kidney for patients with chronic renal failure—a gradual deterioration of kidney function that currently affects over 300,000 people in the United States, a number that is growing by about six percent each year.

People with chronic kidney failure undergo kidney dialysis treatment several times each week to remove toxic waste products from their blood. The procedure is expensive and has serious side effects.

“Our goal is to bring all the components for a bio-artificial kidney together in one implantable device that will carry out all the functions of a natural kidney,” Humes says. “We hope that one day it will be available as an universal-donor organ. This could eliminate the shortage of kidneys for transplant, end long waiting times for transplant organs and replace dialysis as a treatment for chronic renal failure.”

Research on the bio-artificial kidney is being conducted at the Ann Arbor Veteran‘s Administration (VA) Medical Center. Funding is provided by the National Institutes of Health, the VA Research Service and Nephros Therapeutics Inc., a private company established to develop U-M research on kidney tissue engineering into commercial products. Nephros holds exclusive licensing rights to develop the technology; and the U-M has applied for several patents. The U-M, Nephros and Humes hold a financial interest in this new technology.
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment
Kidney Treatment

Kidney Function

Source(google.com.pk)
Kidney Function Biography
Haemodialysis is of vital importance for people with poorly functioning kidneys. If the kidneys are unable to do their job properly, such as removing waste products from the blood, haemodialysis offers, at least temporarily, a solution. During dialysis the blood is purified via a membrane. This process is highly burdensome for the patient and a very expensive method of treatment. Moreover, the ‘cleaning’ is inadequate. Large, protein-bound waste products are poorly removed by haemodialysis or sometimes not at all. In the human body, these substances are normally eliminated by the nephrons. Today’s haemodialysis equipment lacks this component of the kidney function, causing an accumulation of certain waste products. This partly explains why haemodialysis patients develop severe health complaints and require frequent hospital visits. What can we do about it? The ideal solution is kidney transplantation. Unfortunately, this is an option from which not enough people can benefit yet. Every improvement of haemodialysis is therefore extremely welcome.

Better haemodialysis
Work is now underway on the so-called BioKid, a bioreactor of kidney cells to remove toxins that remain after haemodialysis. The bioreactor is a good supplement to present-day haemodialysis and can make the lives of many kidney patients much more tolerable. In effect, BioKid mimics the function and operation of our nephrons. We can achieve this with ‘live membranes’ from special polymers that are covered with a bioactive layer on which human kidney cells can grow. Aside from these smart membranes, we have generated special long-lived kidney cells. With an innovative culture system that is also being developed these kidney cells can be widely used in the hospital or in the clinic. BioKid is an outstanding aid in improving the quality of haemodialysis treatments and in reducing the risk of complications such as cardiovascular problems resulting from the accumulation of toxic waste products. However, it will still take several years before the research is completed and this technique can actually be applied in patients.
Kidney Function 
Kidney Function 
Kidney Function 
Kidney Function 
Kidney Function 
Kidney Function 
Kidney Function 
Kidney Function 
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Kidney Function 
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Kidney Function 

What Is Kidney Function

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What Is Kidney Function Biography
The kidney's job is to process nearly 48 gallons of blood every day. They filter, cleanse, rid the body of toxic wastes and reabsorb nutrients and water. What they cannot use they excrete in the 1 - 2 litres of urine produced every day. The Chinese call the kidneys ‘the master organ’. The kidneys also filter and re-absorb phosphate and calcium from foods, promote strong bones and help secrete a hormone called erythropoietin which acts on bone marrow stem cells stimulating red blood cell production, renin, kinins, and prostaglandins. They also play an important part in controlling blood pressure and manufacturing the active form of vitamin D – cholecalciferol (or calcitriol) or 1,25 dihydroxy.
 
Detoxification
Detoxification takes place in the liver and kidneys. To help alleviate MS symptoms, it is vital that your body detoxifies properly. The problem is that inadequate drainage of toxins through the liver and kidneys can cause a build up of toxicity which in turn can cause extensive free-radical damage, poorer cell function, and disrupted energy production by the mitochondria in the cells. This leads to build up of lactic acid and more toxicity and you may then start experiencing symptoms of fatigue, pain, sickness, poor memory, brain fog, tingling/numbness and balance problems. Also, the brain gets damaged by toxins and free radicals because not enough oxygen can get to the brain. Hormone problems also develop due to injury caused to the hypothalamus. This can also cause temperature and hormone levels to become disrupted. There may also be things like mood swings and PMS
 
The Importance of the Kidneys in Detoxification
As the kidneys work together with the liver it is important that no detoxification programme is done without first supporting the kidneys and the liver. When kidney and liver function is sluggish toxic waste cannot be fully flushed from the body so is circulated around the body in the bloodstream. An overload of toxins can cause irritation and the whole of the urinary tract becomes more prone to infection. Normal kidney function may be interfered with - resulting in water retention, kidney stones and mineral deficiencies. Symptoms of sluggish kidneys include fatigue; a need to urinate frequently, especially at night; a decrease in amount of urine or hesitancy in urination; swelling of the ankles, feet and legs; puffiness around the eyes; low mood and mood swings; agitation; tension; irritability; difficulty concentrating; slow sluggish movements, restless, heavy legs; decreased sexual interest and erectile dysfunction.
 
How to Improve Sluggish Kidney Function
 
First, restrict protein as protein increases metabolic waste, which is something the kidneys must remove from the body. A food intolerance test will help to identify problem foods. Second, avoid chemicals and food additives. Third, maintain calcium, iron and magnesium levels. Magnesium deficiency can have a direct effect on kidney function because of its link to high blood pressure. It is important to eat magnesium rich foods – and these are included in most detoxification diets. Good sources are green vegetables, nuts, seeds and wholegrains. Also, chew food well - this helps digestive enzymes to break food down. Water is very important but too much can be harmful. Eight glasses of pure water a day is fine. Vegetables and fruit are high in water so this can count towards the daily water intake. Restrict alcohol and too much salt and avoid heavy meals. Also avoid fried foods, processed fats, caffeine, sugar, chocolate, dairy products and processed carbohydrates. Finally be cautious with all types of drugs and chemicals, get plenty of sleep and avoid heavy meals.
 
Bio Resonance Scanning
In my clinic I use a unique programme called ‘Bio Resonance Scanning’, an energy therapy based on the principle that every material structure in the universe radiates a unique energy signature or frequency. As individuals we are in fact frequency receivers, transducers and transmitters. The bio resonance technology is able to conduct a ‘conversation’ with the body through frequency patterns and is able to identify, through the process of resonance, the body’s response. It can seek out hidden stressors or imbalances that are putting stress on the system. This programme can identify chemical imbalances, vitamin/mineral imbalances, yeast, candida, mercury toxicity and food imbalances. The bio resonance programme is then able to neutralise the frequency of any toxin present. The programme works beyond removing toxins; it actually “rewires” the body by enhancing healthy frequencies using bioresonance technology. Psychological and emotional imbalances can interfere with the hormonal and endocrine system. This programme can identify these interferences and send a ‘balancing/treatment’ programme to the body for the body to heal itself.
 
Case: Annabel McVeigh, 34, from Hertfordshire was diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS in 2002. She had her first of three bio resonance scans in 2007. At Annabel’s first bio resonance scan comfortable cable connectors or electrodes were placed on her neck and around her wrist. The scanner then took half an hour to converse with the body. A computer printout showed how well the various body organs were working. The scan found that Annabel’s endocrine system, kidneys, liver and lymphatics needed rebalancing. It also uncovered food intolerances. “It was explained to me that I need to make sure I am breaking down my foods and that my detoxification pathways are clear. My body was holding on to toxic waste which can cause symptoms affecting my blood sugar balance, thyroid and kidney/liver strength,” says Annabel. A re-balancing programme was then drawn up by the scanner and bio-resonance patterns were sent to Annabel via the connection cables. After the first session a tiny silver rebalancing “capsule” was given to Annabel which she was told to carry round with her at all times in a pocket and which allowed the rebalancing to take place at a distance – by transmission in “remote mode”. Annabel thinks bio resonance has really worked for her. In 2007 she had a relapse which affected the movement of one of her hands – an area where she had had previous MS problems. After a bio resonance treatment, her hand recovered within a day.
 
Case: Carol Nunn, 61, from Hertford, was diagnosed in 1996. Carol first had a bio resonance scan in 2006. The scan showed that her body was not getting rid of harmful toxins and that some of the foods she was eating i.e. proteins, were not being absorbed properly and taking too many supplements was slowing down detoxification.The scan also identified emotional imbalances. Carol is now on a total ‘rescue’ programme. This consists of structural realignment, diet, supplements (including pre-biotics and pro-biotics), and emotional balancing. When having the bio-resonance scan Carol experienced a “draining and lightness” within her body, and afterwards said that the pain in her eyes and legs had lessened considerably. Her sleeping pattern has improved, walking and energy levels much better than before the treatment, in fact she is now in better health than ten years ago!
 
Case: Claire Conroy-Oldham, 35, from Watford, was diagnosed with MS in 2002. Claire had bio resonance scanning in 2006. The scan revealed her body needed a ‘clean up’. Says Claire: ‘I was advised to take certain supplements, have Cranio Sacral Therapy and avoid the foods I was intolerant to because they were causing stress on my system. These were sugar, alcohol, bread, cakes, sweets, fruit juices and yeast foods like malt, smoked and pickled foods. I wasn’t breaking down protein, and was advised to take digestive enzymes. Now, my eyes are excellent.”
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function
What Is Kidney Function


About Kidney Disease

Source(google.com.pk)
About Kidney Disease Biography
Calcium and phosphorus, which are minerals, help build strong bones. Healthy kidneys help regulate the level of phosphorus in your blood by removing extra phosphorus. If your kidneys aren't working properly, eventually you'll probably have high phosphorus levels in your blood (hyperphosphatemia). Too much phosphorus decreases the level of calcium in your blood, which can lead to bone disease.

Your phosphorus needs may vary, depending on your kidney function. For adults with kidney disease, generally 800 to 1,000 milligrams (mg) of phosphorus a day is the limit. Many healthy adults eat almost double this amount.

Nearly every food contains some phosphorus. As a general rule, foods high in protein are also high in phosphorus. If you have an earlier stage of kidney disease, you'll likely be advised to limit your intake of phosphorus and protein. A reduced-protein diet helps limit the amount of waste that builds up in your blood.

If you have late stage kidney disease and you're on dialysis, the picture changes a bit. Dialysis removes protein (in the form of waste) from your blood, so your protein needs increase — but you'll still need to choose lower phosphorus foods. A registered dietitian can help you choose protein-rich foods that are lower in phosphorus.

Below is a partial listing of foods lower in phosphorus to help you identify substitutes for higher phosphorus foods. Although a food or drink may be low in phosphorus, you still need to watch portion sizes and limit the number of servings you eat or drink each day.
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease 
About Kidney Disease